Video project

Welcome to our free online video resource.
The 60-Seconds of Scicomm project brings together scientists and science communicators to create a catalogue of thoughts, experiences, and advice especially for you.



The four video themes include:



Theme 1) Meet The Scientist - A selection of scientists explaining their research in clear, simple way. It's a great example of how you can easily explain a range of complex topic using everyday language in less than 1 minute!


Theme 2) Let's Talk Scicomm
- Includes contributions from scientists who take part in science communication activities, hoping to inspire and share advice to get other scientists started.




Theme 3) Meet The Scicommers - Videos from people whos work involves communicating science to the general public! Revealing how they started, their favourite methods and how to adapt your research to different audiences.


Theme 4) Scicomm Masters - Want to do something a little bit different? Our final theme has videos from a range of science communication experts covering a range of topics from 'how to write science books for children' to 'how to start a science vlog'!

theme 1 meet the scientists

  1. Meet The Scientists: Shanelle Kohler
    This video is part of the '60 seconds of #scicomm' video series from The Chatty Scientist. Shanelle is a Marine Biologist doing her PhD at the University of Portsmouth. Her research is focused on the effects of the pharmaceuticals that we take which eventually make their way from our bodies to the sea, and how this can affect wildlife. More specifically she studies how antidepressants can affect the behaviours of invertebrates like shrimp and how this can affect their ecology. For example, if a shrimp is less anxious about fish or bird predators are they less likely to run away? If these ‘drugged’ shrimp are easier to catch can this cause pharmaceuticals to build up in the tissues of predators? Could this have any effects on the people who eat the fish? Shanelle is passionate about all things marine biology and does a lot of work through STEM with students aged 11-18 to get them interested in science. Interested in her work? Check out her website (https://www.shanellekohler.com/) or follow her on Twitter (@ShanelleKohler), LinkedIn or Research Gate
  2. Meet The Scientists: Laura Michie
    Laura is a PhD researcher at the University of Portsmouth and also our Communications Officer here at The Chatty Scientist. Laura is investigating the coexistence of ten species of fiddler crab in the Wakatobi Marine National Park, Indonesia. Her research aims to explain how this remarkable level of biodiversity is achieved by looking at how the crabs are dividing the resources and how they are using the habitat differently. Laura is using this knowledge to further the conservation of delicate and complex ecosystems in a time of rapidly changing climates and seas. Human influence is causing a decline in habitats which therefore reduces the number of resources available, Laura's research aims to understand whether animals will be able to adapt to coexist with each other in these declining areas. Laura is passionate about science communication, she has been a STEM ambassador for three years, takes part in public engagement at the Natural History Museum in London and has been lucky enough to work with National Geographic on a documentary.
  3. Meet the Scientists: Heidi Gardner
    Heidi Gardner is a Ph.D. student in Applied Health Sciences at the Health Services Research Unit, University of Aberdeen. She talks about all things Ph.D. life, clinical trials, and science communication over on her blog: www.heidirgardner.wordpress.com, and you can follow her on Instagram and Twitter too (both @heidirgardner).
  4. Meet The Scientists: Gina Kolzenburg
    Gina is a PhD researcher at the University of Portsmouth, a STEM ambassador and took part in public engagement at the Capturing our Coast (CoCoast) citizen science project in Portsmouth. She is investigating the impacts of future climatic changes on coralline algae - a type of seaweed - in Spain, Iceland and the UK. Coralline algae are a pink/purple turf algae which can be found on rocky shores during low tide. They provide habitat, food and shelter for various animals and other seaweeds. To explore if and how coralline algae are affected by climate change, she determines physiological and ecological parameters as well as structural integrity of their skeleton. Gina’s overall aim is to use the knowledge to inform people about the importance of these seaweeds for coastal, intertidal organisms and rocky shore ecosystems and try to create awareness about their conservation need. Find more information about her work on: Twitter: @RKolzenburg http://www.port.ac.uk/school-of-biological-sciences/staff/regina-kolzenburg.html ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Regina_Kolzenburg Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations? user=h8z2xEYAAAAJ&hl=en
  5. Meet the Scientists: Sophia Nasr
    Sophia Nasr is a cosmologist working on her PhD in physics at UC Irvine, with a focus on astroparticle theory. She currently works on dark matter, a mysterious substance that permeates the Universe and comprises 85% of the Universe's matter content. Sophia is passionate about scientific outreach and is an active science communicator. You can find Sophia communicating science on her blog Astropartigirl.com, on Twitter @Astropartigirl, on Instagram @astropartigirl, and on her Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/Astropartigirl
  6. Meet The Scientists: Neil Fuller
    Neil Fuller is a PhD student at the University of Portsmouth studying the effects of environmental radiation on aquatic wildlife. The wider goal of this project is to reduce the uncertainty in assessing the risk of radiation to both humans and wildlife. Neil has been involved in the Capturing Our Coast citizen science project and is hoping to improve his skills as a science communicator. His twitter is: @nfuller29

theme 2 let's talk scicomm

  1. Let's Talk Scicomm: Shanelle Köhler
    Shanelle is a Marine Biologist doing her PhD at the University of Portsmouth. Her research is focused on the effects of the pharmaceuticals that we take which eventually make their way from our bodies to the sea, and how this can affect wildlife. More specifically she studies how antidepressants can affect the behaviours of invertebrates like shrimp and how this can affect their ecology. For example, if a shrimp is less anxious about fish or bird predators are they less likely to run away? If these ‘drugged’ shrimp are easier to catch can this cause pharmaceuticals to build up in the tissues of predators? Could this have any effects on the people who eat the fish? Shanelle is passionate about all things marine biology and does a lot of work through STEM with students aged 11-18 to get them interested in science. Interested in her work? Check out her website (https://www.shanellekohler.com/) or follow her on Twitter (@ShanelleKohler), LinkedIn or Research Gate
  2. Let's Talk Scicomm: Nevena Hristozova
  3. Let's Talk Scicomm: Sophia Nasr
    Sophia Nasr is a cosmologist working on her PhD in physics at UC Irvine, with a focus on Astroparticle theory. She currently works on dark matter, a mysterious substance that permeates the Universe and comprises 85% of the Universe's matter content. Sophia is passionate about scientific outreach and is an active science communicator. You can find Sophia communicating science on her blog Astropartigirl.com, on Twitter @Astropartigirl, on Instagram @astropartigirl, and on her Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/Astropartigirl
  4. Let's Talk Scicomm: Heidi Gardner
    Heidi Gardner is a Ph.D. student in Applied Health Sciences at the Health Services Research Unit, University of Aberdeen. She talks about all things Ph.D. life, clinical trials, and science communication over on her blog: www.heidirgardner.wordpress.com, and you can follow her on Instagram and Twitter too (both @heidirgardner). In this video, she shares her thoughts on why she thinks science communication is important to her research
  5. Let's Talk Scicomm: Laura Michie